Rowman and Littlefield International

Media and Participation in Post-Migrant Societies

Edited by Tanja Thomas, MerleMarie Kruse, and Miriam Stehling

1 Review

Media and Participation in Post‐Migrant Societies addresses an important shortcoming in the research on participation in media cultures by introducing a special focus on post-migrant conditions to the discussion – both as conceptual refinements and as empirical studies.

Hardback ISBN: 9781786607256 Release date: Apr 2019
£90.00 €126.00 $135.00
Ebook ISBN: 9781786607263 Release date: Apr 2019
£29.95 €41.95 $42.50

Pages: 300

Monograph

In contemporary media cultures, media are part of the most important sites where collective
representations and narrations of a post‐migrant civic culture are (re‐)negotiated. At the
same time, they offer powerful resources and instruments for civic participation and collaboration.
Media and Participation in PostMigrant Societies addresses an important shortcoming in
the research on participation in media cultures by introducing a special focus on post-migrant
conditions to the discussion – both as conceptual refinements and as empirical studies.
The contributions of this book provide diverse analyses of the conditions, possibilities,
but also constraints for participation and the role of media communication in the reshaping
of civic culture in post‐migrant societies.

List of Figures and Tables
Foreword (Arjun Appadurai)
Introduction (Merle-Marie Kruse, Miriam Stehling, and Tanja Thomas)

Part I: Conceptual Perspectives on Media and Participation in Post-Migrant Societies

1 (Miriam Stehling, Tanja Thomas, and Merle-Marie Kruse)
Media, Participation, and Collaboration in Post-Migrant Societies
2 (Peter Dahlgren)
Immigrants, Social Media, and Participation: The Long and Winding Road via Integration
3 (Radha S. Hegde)
Dangerous Precarity: Sexual Politics, Migrant Bodies, and the Limits of Participation

Part II: Visibilities and Vulnerabilities of Refugees and Migrants in Media and Art

4 (Rafal Zaborowski)
Between the Vulnerable and the Dangerous: Representations of Refugees in the British Press
5 (Brigitte Hipfl)
Exploring Films’ Potential for Convivial Civic Culture
6 (Katarzyna Marciniak)
Art and Refugeeism: Speaking-with and Speaking-from-within

Part III: Ambiguities and Contestation in Social Media

7 (Sina Arnold and Stephan Görland)
Participatory Logistics from Below: The Role of Smartphones for Syrian Refugees
8 (Anne Kaun and Julie Uldam)
‘It Only Takes Two Minutes’: The So-Called Migration Crisis and Facebook as Civic Infrastructure
9 (Fabian Virchow)
Sentiment-Driven Demands and Scenarios for Political Participation in Nativist SNS

Part IV: Voice and Agency of Marginalized Actors in Post-Migrant Societies

10 (Viktorija Ratković)
From Niche to Mainstream? Post-Migrant Media Production as a Means of Fostering Participation
11 (Tanja Dreher and Poppy de Souza)
Beyond Marginalized Voices: Listening as Participation in Multicultural Media
12 (Steffen Rudolph, Tanja Thomas, and Fabian Virchow)
Doing Memory and Contentious Participation: Remembering the Victims of Right-Wing Violence in German Political Culture
13 (Nico Carpentier)
Memorialization, Participation and Self-Representation: Remembering Refugeedom in the Cypriot Village of Dasaki Achnas

Afterword (Nick Couldry)
Bibliography
About the Contributors

Tanja Thomas, Professor in Media Studies, University of Tuebingen, Germany

Merle‐Marie Kruse, research fellow at the Institute of Media Studies, University of Tuebingen, Germany

Miriam Stehling, postdoctoral researcher at the Institute of Media Studies, University of Tuebingen, Germany

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1 Review

This edited volume is a welcomed contribution to the multidisciplinary crossing of media and migration studies as it explores two recently introduced terms – conviviality and post-migrant societies – from media studies perspectives. This book offers an exciting starting point to examine different local, national and diasporic contexts through the notion of post-migration, a discussion that has started in Germany.

Karina Horsti, Academy of Finland Research Fellow, Department of Social Sciences and Philosophy, University of Jyväskylä

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